Skip to content →

SR may have reduced the psychological sequelae of IPV. Hypothetically, TI-MBSR

SR may have reduced the psychological sequelae of IPV. Hypothetically, TI-MBSR might facilitate therapeutic exposure (Holzel et al., 2011), thereby reducing reactivity to trauma-related thoughts and emotions during mindfulness practice and increasing distress tolerance. Furthermore, In TI-MBSR, participants are taught to recognize when they are dissociating or exhibiting excessive sympathetic arousal to difficult mental contents, and to use techniques like mindful breathing or the body scan to modulate fight/ flight/freeze responses. Through such techniques, which have been shown to induce parasympathetic responses (Jain et al., 2007), participants may have learned to titrate their arousal to counter post-traumatic stress symptoms. For IPV survivors suffering from uncontrollable autonomic arousal, the experience of enhanced self-regulatory capacity might have also increased self-efficacy. Furthermore, mindfulness coupled with psychoeducation on trauma may have enhanced self-compassion, thereby reducing shame and consequent symptoms of depression. Lastly, it is possible that mindfulness practice may have 3-MAMedChemExpress 3-Methyladenine facilitated a reframing of past traumas, thereby facilitating post-traumatic growth in the wake of IPV (Garland, Farb, Goldin, Fredrickson, 2015). To be clear, these hypothetical mechanisms were not directly assessed in the present study. Future studies should biobehavioral research methods to probe the effects of TI-MBSR on cognitive, affective, and psychophysiological mechanisms implicated in IPV. Importantly, statistically significant reductions were found for measures of anxious attachment for the TI-MBSR group compared to the wait-list control group. To our knowledge, this is the first finding in the literature of a UNC0642 manufacturer mindfulness-based intervention positively impacting attachment style in the context of a RCT. This finding is remarkable, given the relatively brief duration of intervention. The intentional focus on present-moment relational experiences taught in the TI-MBSR intervention may have contributed to changes in anxious attachment. Participants were encouraged to practice non-reactive, presentJ Clin Psychol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2017 April 01.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptKelly and GarlandPagemoment awareness while engaged in relationships, both in session (during group discussions) and in their day-to-day lives. This practice of mindful awareness was aimed at differentiating current from past relational experiences and decreasing preoccupation with past attachments. Present-moment awareness of current relationships, coupled with increased self-regulatory capacity, may allow survivors with an anxious attachment style to engage adaptively in their adult relationships. In contrast, avoidant attachment was not found to be significantly different for participants in the TI-MBSR group as compared to the wait-list control. Though future moderation analyses are needed, study findings may provide some indication that the TI-MBSR model may have greater therapeutic impact on individuals with anxious attachment styles than those with avoidant attachment styles. This study had a number of limitations. Most notably, the use of a wait-list control condition limits our ability to determine the therapeutically active components of the TI-MBSR intervention. The clinical outcomes observed might be due to a range of non-specific therapeutic factors, such as attention by a caring professio.SR may have reduced the psychological sequelae of IPV. Hypothetically, TI-MBSR might facilitate therapeutic exposure (Holzel et al., 2011), thereby reducing reactivity to trauma-related thoughts and emotions during mindfulness practice and increasing distress tolerance. Furthermore, In TI-MBSR, participants are taught to recognize when they are dissociating or exhibiting excessive sympathetic arousal to difficult mental contents, and to use techniques like mindful breathing or the body scan to modulate fight/ flight/freeze responses. Through such techniques, which have been shown to induce parasympathetic responses (Jain et al., 2007), participants may have learned to titrate their arousal to counter post-traumatic stress symptoms. For IPV survivors suffering from uncontrollable autonomic arousal, the experience of enhanced self-regulatory capacity might have also increased self-efficacy. Furthermore, mindfulness coupled with psychoeducation on trauma may have enhanced self-compassion, thereby reducing shame and consequent symptoms of depression. Lastly, it is possible that mindfulness practice may have facilitated a reframing of past traumas, thereby facilitating post-traumatic growth in the wake of IPV (Garland, Farb, Goldin, Fredrickson, 2015). To be clear, these hypothetical mechanisms were not directly assessed in the present study. Future studies should biobehavioral research methods to probe the effects of TI-MBSR on cognitive, affective, and psychophysiological mechanisms implicated in IPV. Importantly, statistically significant reductions were found for measures of anxious attachment for the TI-MBSR group compared to the wait-list control group. To our knowledge, this is the first finding in the literature of a mindfulness-based intervention positively impacting attachment style in the context of a RCT. This finding is remarkable, given the relatively brief duration of intervention. The intentional focus on present-moment relational experiences taught in the TI-MBSR intervention may have contributed to changes in anxious attachment. Participants were encouraged to practice non-reactive, presentJ Clin Psychol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2017 April 01.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptKelly and GarlandPagemoment awareness while engaged in relationships, both in session (during group discussions) and in their day-to-day lives. This practice of mindful awareness was aimed at differentiating current from past relational experiences and decreasing preoccupation with past attachments. Present-moment awareness of current relationships, coupled with increased self-regulatory capacity, may allow survivors with an anxious attachment style to engage adaptively in their adult relationships. In contrast, avoidant attachment was not found to be significantly different for participants in the TI-MBSR group as compared to the wait-list control. Though future moderation analyses are needed, study findings may provide some indication that the TI-MBSR model may have greater therapeutic impact on individuals with anxious attachment styles than those with avoidant attachment styles. This study had a number of limitations. Most notably, the use of a wait-list control condition limits our ability to determine the therapeutically active components of the TI-MBSR intervention. The clinical outcomes observed might be due to a range of non-specific therapeutic factors, such as attention by a caring professio.

Published in Uncategorized

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply