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Pesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published

Pesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final citable form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.Magsamen-Conrad et al.Pagesocial support, leisure, work, and relationship maintenance (Volkom, Stapley, Malter, 2013). Uses of ICTs are not limited to any particular user group or certain professional field but rather, have expanded their reach to a wide variety of user groups including teenagers and both younger and older adults (Wilkowska Ziefle, 2009). That said, there are important variances in the ways that each of the user groups uses technology. A considerable number of recent studies revealed that as the age differs, so does the possibility of making different choices on the adoption and use of technology (e.g., Arning Ziefle, 2007; Chen Chan, 2011; Hawthorn, 2000). When it comes to usage rates of technologies such as computers and mobile phones, generational differences emerge in the form of what is referred to as the “digital divide” (Chen Chen, 2011). In general, digital divide refers to the gap of the level of accessibility and usability to new information and communication technologies between those who are more and less aware of their existence, and experienced in their use (Morrisett, 2001). Recent research of tablet users indicated the possibility of an existing digital divide among generations in the U.S. population. According to one report, older adults (aged 75 and older) are less likely to own a tablet than younger adults. Yet, purchase Isoarnebin 4 tablets have been extremely popular amongst U.S. adults aged 65 and younger (Zickuhr, 2011). Related research has focused on the physiological and cognitive factors regarding the digital divide among generations. These studies revealed that unlike the younger generation, concerns such as the perceived requirements for adopting and using technologies impacted the older generation’s use of information technology to a much greater degree (e.g., Alvseike Br nick, 2012; Barnard et al., 2013; Hawthorn, 2000). Due to rapidly changing technology trends, questions concerning the digital divide among generations need further investigation, particularly with respect to new technologies. Recent developments of new communication technologies are creating sophisticated communication environments. For example, given their increasingly integrated and mobile platforms, smartphones and other devices are supplementing computers by helping people access the Internet anytime and anywhere (Blank Dutton, 2013). Similarly, powerful and highly mobile tablets continue to gain ground within the tech-consumer sector, and offer much promise for improving the LCZ696 custom synthesis quality of life of those who use them. Despite this, only a limited number of studies have explored digital divide issues within the context of tablet adoption and use. This line of inquiry is important as it can serve as a model for the development of other training programs designed to facilitate the teaching, learning, and adoption of new technologies within diverse organizational settings, and for diverse populations. Thus, the main goal of this study was twofold: First, we explored variables from the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT; Venkatesh Morris, 2000; Venkatesh, Morris, G. Davis, and F. Davis, 2003) to better understand generational differences related to tablet.Pesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final citable form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.Magsamen-Conrad et al.Pagesocial support, leisure, work, and relationship maintenance (Volkom, Stapley, Malter, 2013). Uses of ICTs are not limited to any particular user group or certain professional field but rather, have expanded their reach to a wide variety of user groups including teenagers and both younger and older adults (Wilkowska Ziefle, 2009). That said, there are important variances in the ways that each of the user groups uses technology. A considerable number of recent studies revealed that as the age differs, so does the possibility of making different choices on the adoption and use of technology (e.g., Arning Ziefle, 2007; Chen Chan, 2011; Hawthorn, 2000). When it comes to usage rates of technologies such as computers and mobile phones, generational differences emerge in the form of what is referred to as the “digital divide” (Chen Chen, 2011). In general, digital divide refers to the gap of the level of accessibility and usability to new information and communication technologies between those who are more and less aware of their existence, and experienced in their use (Morrisett, 2001). Recent research of tablet users indicated the possibility of an existing digital divide among generations in the U.S. population. According to one report, older adults (aged 75 and older) are less likely to own a tablet than younger adults. Yet, tablets have been extremely popular amongst U.S. adults aged 65 and younger (Zickuhr, 2011). Related research has focused on the physiological and cognitive factors regarding the digital divide among generations. These studies revealed that unlike the younger generation, concerns such as the perceived requirements for adopting and using technologies impacted the older generation’s use of information technology to a much greater degree (e.g., Alvseike Br nick, 2012; Barnard et al., 2013; Hawthorn, 2000). Due to rapidly changing technology trends, questions concerning the digital divide among generations need further investigation, particularly with respect to new technologies. Recent developments of new communication technologies are creating sophisticated communication environments. For example, given their increasingly integrated and mobile platforms, smartphones and other devices are supplementing computers by helping people access the Internet anytime and anywhere (Blank Dutton, 2013). Similarly, powerful and highly mobile tablets continue to gain ground within the tech-consumer sector, and offer much promise for improving the quality of life of those who use them. Despite this, only a limited number of studies have explored digital divide issues within the context of tablet adoption and use. This line of inquiry is important as it can serve as a model for the development of other training programs designed to facilitate the teaching, learning, and adoption of new technologies within diverse organizational settings, and for diverse populations. Thus, the main goal of this study was twofold: First, we explored variables from the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT; Venkatesh Morris, 2000; Venkatesh, Morris, G. Davis, and F. Davis, 2003) to better understand generational differences related to tablet.

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